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TIPS & TRICKS to make PREMIUM MEMBERSHIP work for you!


There's no single "correct" way to submit your work, which is why we designed the SS Premium Membership. We understand that a writer shouldn't be confined to a third-party form with a word limit. After nine years of working closely with industry professionals, we've identified some common preferences for submission formats. Trust your instincts and your process, but consider adopting some of their suggestions.

7 QUICK TIPS for when a PRO IS SEARCHING FOR A SCRIPT:

 

  1. NEVER send the script immediately - this is a major faux pas.

  2. Provide a concise logline (under 70 words) and a 1-3 paragraph synopsis.

  3. Create a brief, personalized introduction to show you've read their ad, rather than copying and pasting.

  4. Clearly and quickly convey the genre, medium (film, TV, etc.), and your bio/background.

  5. Ensure your work is protected/copyrighted.

  6. Since 99% of industry pros don't want attachments from strangers, place your query letter in the email body (unless they request an attachment). This makes for a faster, neater, and simpler read.

  7. With SS, you'll receive the pro's details before submitting, so there's no reason not to address them by first and last name (not "Dear Producer:").

 

Ultimately, the script sells itself, but a professional query letter and email can help get the ball rolling!

 

Here are some blogs we wrote on QUERY LETTERS.

SEVEN QUICK TIPS for when a PRO IS SEARCHING FOR A SCREENWRITER:

  1. Avoid using a generic cover letter; customize your "pitch" to their specific screenwriting requirements.

  2. Highlight your relevant credits; if they're looking for a horror screenwriter, don't emphasize your comedy achievements.

  3. Like any job, screenwriting requires a resume. Include past and current screenwriting or writing-related positions, education, bio, credits, references, skills (e.g., Final Draft, WriterDuet, or Movie Magic), and contest wins/placements – anything film-related.

  4. Include this information in the email body, but also consider attaching a PDF resume, as producers are more likely to open attachments when seeking a screenwriter. Summarize your skills/experience in the email body.

  5. Pros want evidence of produced work, so provide as many links to viewable content as possible.

  6. Most pros request a writing sample. Keep it relevant to their needs and only send materials that best represent your work.

  7. Once again, with SS providing the pro's details before submitting, there's no excuse not to address them by first and last name (not "Dear Producer:").

Here is a blog we wrote on RESUMES.

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